Liberty Rising

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liberty.jpg

Liberty Rising

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About

Author Pegi Deitz Shea, Illustrated by Wade Zahares

 

Liberty should shine here on this island, Bartholdi decided, where she can welcome all to America.

The story behind Liberty’s construction and the visionaries who made it happen Liberty Rising

The Statue of Liberty stands as a powerful symbol of freedom to all. But what is her story? How did she come to be? From conception to construction, each element of the Statue of Liberty has a fascinating story of its own: a face bearing the likeness of the creator’s mother; a hand and a torch traveling alone to America; seventy train cars packed with pieces.

Pegi Deitz Shea's inspiring and beautifully illustrated picture book celebrates the visionaries behind the statue and the process by which they carried out the design and building of one of the world’s most important monuments.

 

Product Details

Age Range: 5 - 9 years
Grade Level: Kindergarten - 4
Lexile Measure: 1030L (What's this?)
Paperback: 40 pages
Publisher: Square Fish (May 21, 2013)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1250027209
ISBN-13: 978-1250027207
Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.7 x 0.1 inches
Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
Average Customer Review:
5.0 out of 5 stars

 

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Grade 1-4–Using the concept of building a house or an office building, Shea introduces the size and scale of creating such a large object. Readers meet Edouard de Laboulaye, the law professor who first had the idea of building a monument representing freedom that would be a gift to the people of the United States from the people of France. His early planning with Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi is highlighted. Each step in the process, from small model (four feet high) to full size is told in simple text. The dismantling of the statue, the 214 train cars that transported it to Rouen for the trip across the Atlantic, and its arrival in New York Harbor in 1885 are mentioned. Finally, the unveiling of the statue on October 28, 1886, is highlighted. The book is easy to read, with three-quarter spreads of illustration and single columns of text. The stylized graphic art is fairly realistic with bold colors and unusual angles to create a sense of excitement. They often have a collage effect. They are a trifle busy and sometimes a sense of the scale of the statue gets lost. Two pages of interesting facts appear at the end of the book. This title is more accessible to young readers but much less interesting and captivating than Lynn Curlee's Liberty (S & S, 2000) and Betsy Maestro's The Story of the Statue of Liberty (HarperCollins, 1989).–Susan Lissim, Dwight School, New York City
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Booklist

Gr. 2-4. Lady Liberty's story is particularly resonant at this time of cooling relations between France and the U.S., and the statue, an icon of the American melting pot, provides a smooth entree to classroom discussions of our nation's founding ideals. Shea's picture book provides good coverage of the topic for children not yet ready for the longer narrative in Lynn Curlee's Liberty (2000). No more than three short paragraphs of text appear on every spread, set alongside scenes rendered in the same exuberant, wildly colored pastels as in Zahares' Window Music (1998) and Delivery 2001). The emphasis on abstract forms over realistic detail may disappoint some children (Curlee's book has more straightforward images), but the double-gatefold portrait of the statue from pedestal base to torch tip will be universally admired. A time line, pronunciation guides for French names, and titles for further reading will be appreciated by teachers and young researchers alike. Jennifer Mattson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“The stylized graphic art is fairly realistic with bold colors and unusual angles to create a sense of excitement.” —School Library Journal

“The double-gatefold portrait of the statue from pedestal base to torch tip will be universally admired. A time line, pronunciation guides for French names, and titles for further reading will be appreciated by teachers and young researchers alike.” —Booklist